To Everna and Beyond!

An exploration of Fantasy and Science Fiction Worlds in literature and multimedia entertainment
The official blog and novelblog for Evernade Saga and FireHeart Saga by Andry Chang

"Come forth, Paladins! Fulfill your destiny!"

Explore Worlds in Clicks

FireHeart Highlights!

Friday, September 28, 2007

BASTARD!! Episode IV

Episode 4 (1/3)



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E1S5IkrKRq8


Episode 4 (2/3)



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9djY6ylGo-Y


Episode 4 (3/3)



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-sVYTN-GYZQ

Thursday, September 27, 2007

Adventure Quest























RPG Web-Based Fantasy Game
http://www.battleon.com/

What is AdventureQuest?

AdventureQuest is a fully Flash-animated RPG that you can play when you are on your lunchbreak, when the big game servers go down, or even for hours every day! You fight against hordes of monsters and enemies so that you can grow stronger and obtain ancient weapons of unimaginable power. You need nothing more than your web browser and the latest Macromedia Flash plugin to play.

Create a NEW Free Account today and enter the world of AdventureQuest! Explore an entire world, filled with over 700 monsters, hundreds of items, magical powers to gain, and many classes to master! Become a Fighter, Wizard, Ninja, Vampire Slayer, Rogue, Knight, Mage, Paladin, Dragonslayer, and more.

Always changing! This game is in an ongoing development phase. We are always creating and adding new content to the game and updating the main game engine to improve the experience for everyone. New quests, areas, items or events show up every week in AdventureQuest!
There are currently over 600 unique enemies to encounter, 400 unique weapons, over 150 unique armors and shields to use, and hundreds of spells and pets to aid you in battle, all found in dozens of quests, towns and areas through the world.

BJ Vadis' Note:
Hehe, meet Cristophe Deveraux from FireHeart - Legend of the Paladins in
Adventure Quest!

Wednesday, September 26, 2007

BASTARD!! Episode 3

BASTARD!!!
Episode III

Part 1/3


Source:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aQQpvLRYmmI

Part 2/3


Source:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M940Z86YS80


Part 3/3


Source:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lkre8Z3vfqI

Gotta... finish... blogging these all! Bastaaardsss!!! Aaargghh!!!

Tuesday, September 25, 2007

Enter the Strange Lands Correspondent Contest


new for september! Looking for more haunting vampire books? Read below for our suggestions. Plus, put your writing skills to the test and you could win a trip to Comi-Con New York in 2008!


The His Dark Materials Omnibus
by Philip Pullman

For the first time, all three books of Philip Pullman's award-winning His Dark Materials trilogy (The Golden Compass, The Subtle Knife, and The Amber Spyglass) will be published in their entirety in one volume.
Read about the Omnibus


See Philip Pullman In NYC This Fall!
For New York area subscribers: Philip Pullman, author of the His Dark Materials trilogy will be interviewed as part of the TimesTalk series.


Click here for details and tickets.

Philip Pullman will also appear at Barnes and Noble Union Square in New York City, Thursday November 1st at 7 PM. Location: 33 East 17th Street.

A New Philip Pullman Book Announced for Next Year!
David Fickling Books is delighted to announce the worldwide publication of Once Upon a Time in the North by Philip Pullman, a beguiling and intriguing new episode from Philip Pullman's His Dark Materials universe. Read more about this upcoming book!


New at the Golden Compass Movie Site!

Check out the new superblog at the Golden Compass movie
site and find out the latest on content, news, and events!





 

Enter the Strange Lands Correspondent Contest!

The Strange Lands Newsletter goes head to head with your favorite science fiction and fantasy authors! If you have what it takes to be a Strange Lands Correspondent you could win an exclusive interview with Amelia Atwater-Rhodes—author
of the The Kiesha'ra series—and a trip to interview her at the
New York City Comic-Con Convention in 2008!

Enter the Strange Lands Correspondent Contest!

Find out more about Wyvernhail—the latest book from Amelia Atwater-Rhodes!


 


Thirsty for more Books about Vampires?

Don't miss these spine-chilling reads!

Prom Dates from Hell
by Rosemary Clement-Moore | price: $15.99

Six weeks from graduation and all Maggie Quinn wants to do is get out of Avalon High in one piece. read more

The Silver Kiss
by Annette Curtis Klause | price: $8.99

"Strangely persuasive...at once a grisly and graphic tale of monstrous death and a sweet and compelling story of love." —Entertainment Weekly
read more


Wildwood Dancing

by Juliet Marillier | price: $16.99

It's an idyllic life for Jena, who spends her time exploring the mysterious forest with her constant companion, a most unusual frog. read more




Edge Chronicles 9: Clash of the Sky Galleons
by Paul Stewart and Chris Riddell |
price: $12.99

In the penultimate book in the Edge Chronicles series, Quint is travelling with his father, Wind Jackal, on a mission to track down and bring to justice Turbot Smeal, the man who started the fire that killed their family. Having left behind his studies at the Knights Academy, Quint is now eager to learn from his father what it really means to be a sky pirate. read more

Visit EdgeChronicles.com



Copyright © 2007 Random House, inc. All Rights Reserved.

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Saturday, September 22, 2007

Romance of the Three Kingdoms Quiz

Dynasty Warriors / Romance of the Three Kingdoms Quiz



In Which Kingdom Do You Belong to? (Wei/Wu/Shu/Others?)
http://www.yueying.net/dw/?quiz=kingdom

BJ Vadis' Result:

Dynasty Warriors Kingdom Quiz result: Shu


Which Officer of Shu are you?
http://www.yueying.net/dw/?quiz=shu

BJ Vadis' Result:

Dynasty Warriors Shu Quiz result: Zhao Yun

Which Officer of Wu are you?
http://www.yueying.net/dw/?quiz=wu

BJ Vadis' Result:










Which Officer of Wei Are You?
http://www.yueying.net/dw/?quiz=wei

BJ Vadis' Result:

Friday, September 21, 2007

FireHeart Paladins - Characters Update Sept07-1

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Ney'varith Luvazel
Thyrine, Elf Water Enchantress

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Oliver MacLair
Wardstone, Human - Assassin
Tarot Sign: Death

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Dejan Pavlovic
Regia Confederation, Halfling
Tarot Sign: World

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Bragl Dar'gum
Gremion, Orc Berserker
Tarot Sign: Hanged Man

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Lavennia Iris
Thyrine, Elf Wind/Nature Enchantress
Tarot Sign: Temperance

FireHeart Banners n Headers (Archive Post)

Want to link to us? Please support fh by putting these banners and blog tags in your website. And, from the bottom of my heart, I thank you.

FireHeart Logo Banner
170 x 220px

FireHeart.tk



FireHeart Banner 1
480 x 90px

FireHeart Saga NovelBlog



FireHeart Archived Headers

Agt 07
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Jul 07
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

BASTARD!! Episode 2 part3



Source:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WEu8hvekSA4

BASTARD!! Episode 2 part2



Source:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=odQy23qi8qA

BASTARD!! Episode 2 part1

Source:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GglhtUPcD7c

Wednesday, September 19, 2007

BASTARD!! Episode 1



Episode 1 (1/3)
Source: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LOs2r-1ZNKY




Episode 1 (2/3)
Source: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5tZ8eefG3Ko




Episode 1 (3/3)
Source: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pfaPdX7GXqw

Evanescense - Bring me to life (Final Fantasy anime version)




Provided By:
This is an anime musicvideo with small clips from the Final Fantasy 8, 9 and 10 games, all put to the music of Evanescense's "Bring me to life". The video was made by Cass Morgan.




Source:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dRv1FRW1-18

Sunday, September 16, 2007

Excalibur

Excalibur

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search
How Sir Bedivere Cast the Sword Excalibur into the Water. Illustration by Aubrey Beardsley, 1894
How Sir Bedivere Cast the Sword Excalibur into the Water. Illustration by Aubrey Beardsley, 1894

Excalibur is the mythical sword of King Arthur, sometimes attributed with magical powers or associated with the rightful sovereignty of Great Britain. Sometimes Excalibur and the Sword in the Stone (the proof of Arthur's lineage) are said to be the same weapon, but in most versions they are considered separate. The sword was associated with the Arthurian legend very early. In Welsh, the sword is called Caledfwlch.

Contents

[hide]

[edit] Forms and etymologies

The name Excalibur came from Old French Excalibor, which came from Caliburn used in Geoffrey of Monmouth (c. 1140) (Latin Caliburnus). There are also variant spellings such as Escalibor and Excaliber (the latter used in Howard Pyle's books for younger readers). One theory holds that Caliburn[us] comes from Caledfwlch, the original Welsh name for the sword, which is first mentioned in the Mabinogion. This may be cognate with Caladbolg ("hard-belly", i.e. "voracious"), a legendary Irish sword (see below). Another theory (noted in The New Arthurian Encyclopedia, 1995) states that "Caliburnus" is ultimately derived from Latin chalybs "steel", which is in turn derived from Chalybes, the name of an Anatolian ironworking tribe. This is noted and used by the historian Valerio Massimo Manfredi in his novel The Last Legion (2002: the English translation has Calibian instead of the intended Chalybian). According to Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable by Ebenezer Cobham Brewer, Excalibur was originally derived from the Latin phrase Ex calce liberatus, "liberated from the stone". In Malory, Excalibur is said to mean "cut-steel", which some have interpreted to mean "steel-cutter".

[edit] Excalibur and the Sword in the Stone

Excalibur the Sword, by Howard Pyle (1902), depicting Arthur receiving his sword from the Lady of the Lake
Excalibur the Sword, by Howard Pyle (1902), depicting Arthur receiving his sword from the Lady of the Lake

In surviving accounts of Arthur, there are two originally separate legends about the sword's origin. The first is the "Sword in the Stone" legend, originally appearing in Robert de Boron's poem Merlin, in which Excalibur can only be drawn from the stone by Arthur, the rightful king. The second comes from the later Post-Vulgate Suite du Merlin, which was taken up by Sir Thomas Malory. Here, Arthur receives Excalibur from the Lady of the Lake after breaking his first sword in a fight with King Pellinore. The Lady of the Lake calls the sword "Excalibur, that is as to say as Cut-steel," and Arthur takes it from a hand rising out of the lake.

As Arthur lies dying, he tells Sir Bedivere (Sir Griflet in some versions) to return his sword to the lake by throwing it into the water. Bedivere is reluctant to throw away such a precious sword, so twice he only pretends to do so. Each time, Arthur asks him to describe what he saw. When Bedivere tells him the sword simply fell into the water, Arthur scolds him harshly. Finally, Bedivere throws Excalibur into the lake. Before the sword strikes the water's surface, a hand reaches up to grasp it and pulls it under. Arthur leaves on a death barge with the three queens to Avalon, where as his legend says, he will one day return to rule in Britain's darkest hour.

Malory records both versions of the legend in his Le Morte d'Arthur, and confusingly calls both swords Excalibur. The film Excalibur attempts to rectify this by having only one sword, which Arthur inherits through his father and later breaks; the Lady of the Lake then repairs it.

[edit] History

A statue of Excalibur in the gardens at Kingston Maurward
A statue of Excalibur in the gardens at Kingston Maurward

[edit] Caledfwlch

In Welsh legend, Arthur's sword is known as Caledfwlch. In Culhwch and Olwen, it is one of Arthur's most valuable possessions and is used by Arthur's warrior Llenlleawg the Irishman to kill the Irish king Diwrnach while stealing his magical cauldron. Caledfwlch is thought to derive from the legendary Irish weapon Caladbolg, the lightning sword of Fergus mac Roich. Caladbolg was also known for its incredible power, and was carried by some of Ireland's greatest heroes.

Though not named as Caledfwlch, Arthur's sword is described vividly in The Dream of Rhonabwy one of the tales associated with the Mabinogion:

Then they heard Cadwr Earl of Cornwall being summoned, and saw him rise with Arthur's sword in his hand, with a design of two serpents on the golden hilt; when the sword was unsheathed what was seen from the mouths of the two serpents was like two flames of fire, so dreadful that it was not easy for anyone to look. At that the host settled and the commotion subsided, and the earl returned to his tent.

From The Mabinogion, translated by Jeffrey Gantz.[1]

[edit] Caliburn to Excalibur

Geoffrey of Monmouth's History of the Kings of Britain is the first non-Welsh source to speak of the sword. Geoffrey says the sword was forged in Avalon and Latinizes the name "Caledfwlch" to Caliburn or Caliburnus. When his influential pseudo-history made it to Continental Europe, writers altered the name further until it became Excalibur. The legend was expanded upon in the Vulgate Cycle (c. 12301250), also known as the Lancelot-Grail Cycle, and in the Post-Vulgate Cycle which emerged in its wake. Both included the work known as the Prose Merlin, but the Post-Vulgate authors left out the Merlin Continuation from the earlier cycle, choosing to add an original account of Arthur's early days including a new origin for Excalibur.

[edit] Other information

The story of the Sword in the Stone has an analogue in some versions of the story of Sigurd (the Norse proto-Siegfried), who draws his father Sigmund's sword out of a tree where it is embedded.

Interestingly, in several early French works such as Chrétien de Troyes' Perceval, the Story of the Grail and the Vulgate Lancelot Proper section, Excalibur is used by Gawain, Arthur's nephew and one of his best knights. This is in contrast to later versions, where Excalibur belongs solely to the king. In the Alliterative Morte Arthure (ca. 1400), Arthur is said to have two legendary swords, the second one being Clarent, stolen by the evil Mordred. Arthur receives his fatal blow from Clarent.

[edit] Attributes

The Lady of the Lake offering Arthur the sword Excalibur.
The Lady of the Lake offering Arthur the sword Excalibur.

In many versions, Excalibur's blade was engraved with words on opposite sides. On one side were the words "take me up", and on the other side "cast me away" (or similar words). This prefigures its return into the water. In addition, when Excalibur was first drawn, Arthur's enemies were blinded by its blade, which was as bright as thirty torches. Excalibur's scabbard was said to have powers of its own. Injuries from losses of blood, for example, would not kill the bearer. In some tellings, wounds received by one wearing the scabbard did not bleed at all. The scabbard is stolen by Morgan le Fay and thrown into a lake, never to be found again.

The 19th century poet Alfred, Lord Tennyson, described the sword in full Romantic detail in his poem "Morte d'Arthur", later rewritten as "The Passing of Arthur", one of the Idylls of the King:

There drew he forth the brand Excalibur,

And o’er him, drawing it, the winter moon,
Brightening the skirts of a long cloud, ran forth
And sparkled keen with frost against the hilt:
For all the haft twinkled with diamond sparks,
Myriads of topaz-lights, and jacinth-work
Of subtlest jewellery.

[edit] See also

Tristan and Isolde

Tristan

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search
Tristan and Iseult as depicted by Herbert Draper (1864 -1920).
Tristan and Iseult as depicted by Herbert Draper
(1864 -1920).

Sir Tristan(Latin/Brythonic: Drustanus; Welsh: Drystan; also known as Tristran, Tristram, etc.) is one of the main characters of the Tristan and Iseult story, a Cornish hero and one of the Knights of the Round Table featuring in the Matter of Britain. He is the son of Blancheflor and Rivalen (in later versions Isabelle and Meliodas), and the nephew of King Mark of Cornwall, sent to fetch Iseult back from Ireland to wed the king. However, he and Iseult accidentally consume a love potion while en route and fall helplessly in love. The pair undergo numerous trials that test their secret affair.

Contents

[hide]

[edit] The Tristan legend cycle

Tristan makes his first medieval appearance in the early twelfth century in Celtic folklore circulating in the north of France. Although the oldest stories concerning Tristan are lost, some of the derivatives still exist. Most early versions fall into one of two branches, "courtly" branch represented in the retellings of the Anglo-Norman poet Thomas of Britain and his German successor Gottfried von Strassburg, and the "common" branch, including the works of the French poet Béroul and the German poet Eilhart von Oberge.

Arthurian romancier Chrétien de Troyes mentions in his poem Cligès that he composed his own account of the story; however, there are no surviving copies or records of any such text. In the thirteenth century, during the great period of prose romances, appeared the Tristan en prose or Prose Tristan, one of the most popular romances of its time. This long, sprawling, and often lyrical, work (the modern edition takes up thirteen volumes) follows Tristan from the traditional legend into the realm of King Arthur where Tristan participates in the Quest for the Holy Grail. In the fifteenth century, Sir Thomas Malory shortened this French version into his own take, The Book of Sir Tristram de Lyones, found in his Le Morte D'Arthur.

[edit] Historical roots

There are strange aspects to Tristan, such as his Pictish name. Drust is a very common name of Pictish kings, and Drustanus is merely Drust rendered into Latin. It may have originated from an ancient legend regarding a Pictish king who slew a giant in the distant past, which had spread throughout the isles.

Another strange aspect is his kingdom, Lyonesse, for whose existence there is no evidence. However there were two places called Leonais: one in Brittany, the other the Old French transcription of Lothian. However, the Islands of Scilly have also been proposed to be this place, since they were possibly one island until Roman times and several islands are interconnected at low tide. Regardless, Tristan being a prince of Lothian would make his name more sensible, Lothian being on the borderlands of the Pictish High-Kingship (and once was a part of Pictish territory; Tristan may in fact have been a Pictish prince under a British King). One suggestion is that he could have been adopted into the family of Mark of Cornwall, historically a practice attested in Roman law.

[edit] The Tristan and Iseult romance

Main article: Tristan and Iseult

The romantic narrative of the Tristan and Iseult love affair predated and most likely influenced the Arthurian romance of Lancelot and Guinevere.[citation needed] The legend tells of the love affair between Tristan and Iseult of Ireland (the promised bride of Tristan's uncle), and the events and trials that the lovers go through to cover up their secret affair.

[edit] Modern adaptations

In 1857–59, Richard Wagner composed the opera Tristan and Isolde, now considered one of the most influential pieces of music of the 19th century. In his work, Tristan is portrayed as a doomed romantic figure.

Algernon Charles Swinburne wrote an epic poem Tristram of Lyonesse. The story has also been adapted into film many times. [1] The most recent is the American version entitled Tristan & Isolde, produced by Tony and Ridley Scott, written by Dean Georgaris, directed by Kevin Reynolds, and starring James Franco and Sophia Myles. The story of Tristan has also been represented through the song of the same name by the artist Patrick Wolf.

Tristan plays a prominent role in the comic book series Camelot 3000, in which he is reincarnated in A.D. 3000 as a woman and subsequently struggles to come to terms with his new body and identity and to reconcile them in turn with his previous notions of gender roles and of his own sexuality.

Russian composer Nikita Koshkin wrote a classical guitar solo entitled Tristan Playing the Lute in 1983. Tristan Playing the Lute evokes the spirit of Tristan from the legend of "Tristan and Isolde", set in a playful adaptation of traditional English lute music, at least initially. According to Koshkin:

"Tristan was written as a musical joke. It was a period when I was fond of all the stories about King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table. Tristan was not only a great fighter, but he also played many musical instruments and had a beautiful singing voice. This is why I thought he could be the subject of a piece to suggest the process of improvising in a characteristic early style that then begins to change to futuristic musical ideas. The first section of the piece is clearly ancient in style; the second is more modern; then the third introduces elements of Eastern music as well as some rock riffs. The idea is that Tristan, during his improvising, is building musical bridges to the future."

In the 2004 film, King Arthur, based on the Sarmatian connection theory of origin for the Arthurian legends, Tristan (Mads Mikkelsen) is a prominent member of the knights, who are Sarmatians serving under a half-Roman Arthur in the 5th century. He is a cavalry archer, and uses a sword similar to, if not a dao. It seems that he finds a pleasure in killing and is quite good at it. He has a pet falcon, which he greatly treasures and uses as a lookout for Arthur and the rest of the knights in the film. He is killed by Cerdic in single combat in the Battle of Badon Hill

Tristan and Isolde

Tristan

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search
Tristan and Iseult as depicted by Herbert Draper (1864 -1920).
Tristan and Iseult as depicted by Herbert Draper
(1864 -1920).

Sir Tristan(Latin/Brythonic: Drustanus; Welsh: Drystan; also known as Tristran, Tristram, etc.) is one of the main characters of the Tristan and Iseult story, a Cornish hero and one of the Knights of the Round Table featuring in the Matter of Britain. He is the son of Blancheflor and Rivalen (in later versions Isabelle and Meliodas), and the nephew of King Mark of Cornwall, sent to fetch Iseult back from Ireland to wed the king. However, he and Iseult accidentally consume a love potion while en route and fall helplessly in love. The pair undergo numerous trials that test their secret affair.

Contents

[hide]

[edit] The Tristan legend cycle

Tristan makes his first medieval appearance in the early twelfth century in Celtic folklore circulating in the north of France. Although the oldest stories concerning Tristan are lost, some of the derivatives still exist. Most early versions fall into one of two branches, "courtly" branch represented in the retellings of the Anglo-Norman poet Thomas of Britain and his German successor Gottfried von Strassburg, and the "common" branch, including the works of the French poet Béroul and the German poet Eilhart von Oberge.

Arthurian romancier Chrétien de Troyes mentions in his poem Cligès that he composed his own account of the story; however, there are no surviving copies or records of any such text. In the thirteenth century, during the great period of prose romances, appeared the Tristan en prose or Prose Tristan, one of the most popular romances of its time. This long, sprawling, and often lyrical, work (the modern edition takes up thirteen volumes) follows Tristan from the traditional legend into the realm of King Arthur where Tristan participates in the Quest for the Holy Grail. In the fifteenth century, Sir Thomas Malory shortened this French version into his own take, The Book of Sir Tristram de Lyones, found in his Le Morte D'Arthur.

[edit] Historical roots

There are strange aspects to Tristan, such as his Pictish name. Drust is a very common name of Pictish kings, and Drustanus is merely Drust rendered into Latin. It may have originated from an ancient legend regarding a Pictish king who slew a giant in the distant past, which had spread throughout the isles.

Another strange aspect is his kingdom, Lyonesse, for whose existence there is no evidence. However there were two places called Leonais: one in Brittany, the other the Old French transcription of Lothian. However, the Islands of Scilly have also been proposed to be this place, since they were possibly one island until Roman times and several islands are interconnected at low tide. Regardless, Tristan being a prince of Lothian would make his name more sensible, Lothian being on the borderlands of the Pictish High-Kingship (and once was a part of Pictish territory; Tristan may in fact have been a Pictish prince under a British King). One suggestion is that he could have been adopted into the family of Mark of Cornwall, historically a practice attested in Roman law.

[edit] The Tristan and Iseult romance

Main article: Tristan and Iseult

The romantic narrative of the Tristan and Iseult love affair predated and most likely influenced the Arthurian romance of Lancelot and Guinevere.[citation needed] The legend tells of the love affair between Tristan and Iseult of Ireland (the promised bride of Tristan's uncle), and the events and trials that the lovers go through to cover up their secret affair.

[edit] Modern adaptations

In 1857–59, Richard Wagner composed the opera Tristan and Isolde, now considered one of the most influential pieces of music of the 19th century. In his work, Tristan is portrayed as a doomed romantic figure.

Algernon Charles Swinburne wrote an epic poem Tristram of Lyonesse. The story has also been adapted into film many times. [1] The most recent is the American version entitled Tristan & Isolde, produced by Tony and Ridley Scott, written by Dean Georgaris, directed by Kevin Reynolds, and starring James Franco and Sophia Myles. The story of Tristan has also been represented through the song of the same name by the artist Patrick Wolf.

Tristan plays a prominent role in the comic book series Camelot 3000, in which he is reincarnated in A.D. 3000 as a woman and subsequently struggles to come to terms with his new body and identity and to reconcile them in turn with his previous notions of gender roles and of his own sexuality.

Russian composer Nikita Koshkin wrote a classical guitar solo entitled Tristan Playing the Lute in 1983. Tristan Playing the Lute evokes the spirit of Tristan from the legend of "Tristan and Isolde", set in a playful adaptation of traditional English lute music, at least initially. According to Koshkin:

"Tristan was written as a musical joke. It was a period when I was fond of all the stories about King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table. Tristan was not only a great fighter, but he also played many musical instruments and had a beautiful singing voice. This is why I thought he could be the subject of a piece to suggest the process of improvising in a characteristic early style that then begins to change to futuristic musical ideas. The first section of the piece is clearly ancient in style; the second is more modern; then the third introduces elements of Eastern music as well as some rock riffs. The idea is that Tristan, during his improvising, is building musical bridges to the future."

In the 2004 film, King Arthur, based on the Sarmatian connection theory of origin for the Arthurian legends, Tristan (Mads Mikkelsen) is a prominent member of the knights, who are Sarmatians serving under a half-Roman Arthur in the 5th century. He is a cavalry archer, and uses a sword similar to, if not a dao. It seems that he finds a pleasure in killing and is quite good at it. He has a pet falcon, which he greatly treasures and uses as a lookout for Arthur and the rest of the knights in the film. He is killed by Cerdic in single combat in the Battle of Badon Hill

Legend of King Arthur

Knights of the Round Table

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

Knights of the Round Table were those men awarded the highest order of Chivalry at the Court of King Arthur in the literary cycle the Matter of Britain. The table at which they met was created to have no head or foot, representing the equality of all the members. Different stories had different numbers of knights, ranging from only 12 to 150 or more. The Winchester Round Table, which dates from the 1270s, lists 25 names of knights.

Sir Thomas Malory describes the Knights' code of chivalry as:

  • To never do outrage nor murder
  • Always to flee treason
  • To by no means be cruel but to give mercy unto him who asks for mercy
  • To always do ladies, gentlewomen and widows succor
  • To never force ladies, gentlewomen or widows
  • Not to take up battles in wrongful quarrels for love or worldly goods

Contents

[hide]

[edit] Origins of the Round Table

The first writer to describe the Round Table was Wace, whose Roman de Brut was an elaboration of Geoffrey of Monmouth's Historia Regum Britanniae. The actual table itself was round in order to represent that each knight was of equal value to the king and thus there was no 'head' of the table, although one understood that Arthur's place was 'the head.' In later writings, the table was said to be a gift to King Arthur from his father-in-law, King Leodogran of Cameliard, as a wedding gift upon the marriage of Arthur to Guinevere. The company was used by many subsequent authors. However, even the earliest writers ascribe to Arthur a following of extraordinary warriors; in Geoffrey, Arthur's court attracts the greatest heroes from all of Europe. In the Welsh Arthurian material, much of which is included in the Mabinogion, Arthur's men are attributed with superhuman abilities. Some of the characters from the Welsh material even appear under altered names as Knights of the Round Table in the continental romances, the most notable of which are Cai (Sir Kay), Bedwyr (Sir Bedivere), and Gwalchmai (Sir Gawain).

[edit] List of Knights of the Round Table

In addition, Malory's account includes many obscure knights during the episode containing Sir Urry:

  • King Angwish of Ireland,
  • Earl Aristance,
  • Sir Azreal,
  • Sir Arrok,
  • Sir Ascamore,
  • Sir Barrant le Apres (King with a Hundred Knights),
  • Sir Bellenger le Beau,
  • Sir Belliance le Orgulous,
  • Sir Blamor de Ganis,
  • Sir Bleoberis de Ganis,
  • Sir Borre le Coeur Hardi (King Arthur's son),
  • Sir Brandiles,
  • Sir Brian de Listinoise,
  • King Carados of Scotland,
  • Sir Cardok,
  • Duke Chalance of Clarence,
  • King Clariance of Northumberland,
  • Sir Clarus of Cleremont,
  • Sir Clegis,
  • Sir Clodrus,
  • Sir Colgrevance,
  • Sir Crosslem,
  • Sir Damas
  • Sir Degrave sans Villainy (fought with the giant of the Black Lowe),
  • Sir Degrevant,
  • Sir Dinas le Seneschal de Cornwall,
  • Sir Dinas

  • Earl Lambaile,
  • Sir Lambegus,
  • Sir Lamiel of Cardiff,
  • Sir Lavain,
  • Sir Lucan the Butler,
  • Sir Mador de la Porte,
  • Sir Marrok (whose wife turned him into a werewolf for seven years),
  • Sir Melias de l'Isle,
  • Sir Melion of the Mountain,
  • Sir Meliot de Logris,
  • Sir Menaduke,
  • Sir Morganor,
  • King Nentres of Garlot,
  • Sir Neroveus,
  • Sir Ozanna le Coeur Hardi,
  • Sir Perimones (brother to Persant and Pertolepe. Called the Red Knight),
  • Sir Persant,
  • Sir Pertolepe,
  • Sir Petipace of Winchelsea,
  • Sir Plaine de Fors,
  • Sir Plenorius,
  • Sir Priamus,
  • Sir Reynold,
  • Sir Sadok,
  • Sir Selises of the Dolorous Tower
  • Sir Sentrail,
  • Sir Severause le Breuse (known for rejecting battles with men in favor of giants, dragons, and wild beasts),
  • Sir Suppinabiles,
  • Earl Ulbawes,
  • Sir Urry,
  • Sir Uwain le Avoutres, and
  • Sir Villiars the Valiant.
  • Sir Dodinas le Savage,
  • Sir Dornar,
  • Sir Driant,
  • Sir Edward of Caernarvon,
  • Sir Edward of Orkney,
  • Sir Epinogris (son of King Clariance of Northumberland),
  • Sir Fergus,
  • Sir Florence and Sir Lovell (sons of Gawain by Sir Brandiles's sister),
  • Sir Gahalantine,
  • Sir Galahalt (a duke known as the Haut Prince),
  • Sir Galihodin,
  • Sir Galleron of Galway,
  • Sir Gauter,
  • Sir Gillimer,
  • Sir Grummor Grummorson,
  • Sir Gumret le Petit,
  • Sir Harry le Fils Lake,
  • Sir Hebes (not Hebes le Renowne),
  • Sir Hebes le Renowne,
  • Sir Hectimere,
  • Sir Helian le Blanc,
  • Sir Herminde,
  • Sir Hervis de la Forest Savage,
  • Sir Ironside (Knight of the Red Launds),
  • Sir Kay l'Estrange (not Kay, Arthur's seneschal),


Sir Urry is a Hungarian knight who comes to Camelot, seeking Arthur's help in healing his wounds. In the end, 110 knights, in addition to Arthur, are unable to heal Sir Urry. When Sir Lancelot arrives in Camelot, his touch heals the wounded knight. This scene depicts all the knights together at the same time, with the exception of those deceased, on quest, or otherwise ascended (as with Galahad).

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